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‘Baby Brother’
Abstract Art Card ACEO - 2005
Each abstract is a very unique creation. Just as one might search for images in the clouds, I search for images in my clay. Each piece is slowly turned in all directions as I search for that beautiful design just waiting to be discovered. Then, using my tools, I bring the image out with defining lines, textured backgrounds and not a little imagination!

The Process:

All my abstracts are made from mixtures of clays. Sometimes, if I am lucky, I will have enough scraps left over from various projects. These are the very best for varieties of blends; the second best being those I make myself. In order to have really good contrast you need at least three colors; one dark, one medium and one light. I do not recommend using white as your light color because it tends to be very stark, likewise, black can be overwhelming and mute the mix too much.

One other mix uses more than the standard three color rule. This mixture consists of randomly grabbing bits of clays till I have a good handful; about the size of a golf ball. These types of mixes can have white or black which add really pretty accents and not be overwhelming because of their small quantity.

I now take these bits of clay or the three color blend, and break them into smaller pieces about the size of a large, single peanut; dropping them in a pile in a sporadic fashion.

When I’m finished breaking up all the clay, I scoop them up and press them into a ball. I knead the clay while pulling and twisting at the same time. This is a crucial step in bringing out really good patterns to work from. If you knead too much, the colors will lose their individuality and be lost in a muted background. Only a minute or so of mixing is usually all that is needed and I then roll the clay into a ball shape again. I now pick a portion that seems to be the most interesting and keeping that side up, I flatten the clay onto my wax paper and gently press and pull until it is approx. ¼ inch thick or a little less than that.

These are pretty much the only tools I use for all my work. They are inexpensive, double-ended sculpting tools, (except for the ‘Exacto’ Knife).
Art Cards are a standard 2.5 x 3.5 inches or the size of a regular playing card. I cut a piece of thin cardboard to these measurements and lay it over the center of the flattened clay. I carefully cut to the shape of this card using the ‘Exacto’ knife.

Now the fun begins... click here to continue


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